Sometimes I say stuff

Sometimes I say stuff – remember I’m a talker – but I have no idea what I’m saying. I heard someone somewhere say it and it sounded reasonable, so I repeat it. I read a snippet about it and it looked good to me, so I share it. Or it’s something “they” say – and you know they are always right – so I say it too.

As a result, I’ve found myself saying and sharing information that I really know nothing about. Or I say things without realizing what it means. And sometimes – it’s not good. Like the time I told my husband that I parked out in “BFE” and he nearly fainted. Needless to say, I don’t use that term any more. (don’t judge – I didn’t know)

Another one of those words is ‘karma’. Sounds like an interesting concept. A good idea. A word that can just easily be tossed out and it sounds right. A harmless word. And it’s trendy – all the cool kids say it.

However, I’ve gotten a little smarter since the BFE incident. So I did a little research because I wanted to understand what I was actually saying. And this is what I learned.

Karma is a spiritual concept found in the Buddhist and Hindu religions and is based upon the belief in reincarnation. The law of karma states that every thought, word or action – whether good or bad – will count in determining how an individual will be born in their next life on earth. It is the idea that how you live your life will determine your quality of life after reincarnation. So an individual with bad karma could be born many different times into a lower human status or even into lower forms of animals (which is why they are vegetarians because you can’t risk eating Uncle Elmer). An individual with good karma will “upgrade” their status in their next life. In Hinduism you have the ability to eventually upgrade to the Brahmin class and be released.

Karma is believed to be the invisible power that balances the universe – giving people what they deserve because their past actions create their present state and their present actions will create their future. Through karma, you create the world into which you are born.

In essence, karma teaches that individuals are in control of their salvation, which is their release from the cycle of birth and rebirth.

I’m no theologian, but none of this seems Biblical to me.

This belief abolishes grace by eliminating the possibility of forgiveness. It says I deserve the good things that come to me because I earned them, therefore denying the blessings of Abba and His goodness to humanity. It says that every bad thing that happens to me is my fault, denying the influence of a sin fallen world and an enemy who is out to steal, kill and destroy. It teaches the philosophy of past lives and more lives to come contradicting the truth that man only dies once.

There are those who believe the idea of karma is found in the Bible in Galatians 5:6-7 Don’t be misled—you cannot mock the justice of God. You will always harvest what you plant. Those who live only to satisfy their own sinful nature will harvest decay and death from that sinful nature. But those who live to please the Spirit will harvest everlasting life from the Spirit.

However, the enemy’s lie of karma is nothing like God’s Law of Sowing and Reaping. The Bible tells us receiving the benefits of godly choices takes place in this life, not in some future life. The Bible also teaches there are negative consequences for choices that are contrary to God’s principles. In addition, the sowing done on earth will affect the reaping in eternity – either in heaven or hell.

So, with that in mind – I won’t be using the word karma. I can’t talk about something that I don’t believe in. And I can’t promote anything that is contrary to the Word of God.

Now, to figure out what “oh for pete’s’ sake” means.

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10 thoughts on “Sometimes I say stuff

  1. I like the article. Just one question, what is BFE? You wondered out loud about “for pete’s sake”. I believe this is a slang for the expression “for Saint Peter’s sake”. I am not positive but it seems likely. For that reason I don’t say it. We are too careless with our words.

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    • Thanks for stopping by! Sorry, but I can repeat what that means – it’s inappropriate 😉

      “For Pete’s sake” originated as a substitute for “for Christ’s sake,” and other similar expressions. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, “for Pete’s sake” came into use more than a century ago and prompted similar sayings such as “for the love of Pete” in 1906 and “in the name of Pete” in 1942.

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    • Thanks for stopping by and commenting. The idea of karma seems so clever and “right” – it definitely appeals to our humanity. But it’s just another lie crafted by the father of lies.

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  2. Thank you for explaining “Karma” I too have used this word in the past .I will not continue to now that I know the true meaning.
    Thanx Kim as usual you are AWESOME !

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  3. I love this Kim. I have so many friends who use this word. “Karma will get them”. It’s used as a type of curse against anyone who offends them. I never knew the origins of it so thanks for sharing. I will have to let a few people read this.

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    • Thanks Shawna 🙂 It sound trendy. Sounds cool. It could even sound Biblical. But it’s one of the enemy’s attempts to distract us – slight off but not quite right. And bit by bit he leads us down a road of “not quite right” ideas until we’ve gotten off track. I always want to hold to the standard of God’s Word. And if it doesn’t fit, I have to discard.

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